Poetry

Ken Evans

Waiting at Manchester Piccadilly

Platform 3 under Arrivals: the digital board
slides down a blazing candle-wick of all
the stations on the Trans-Pennine line:
Leeds, Bradford, Dewsbury, Huddersfield.

A grandchild cranes to see Nana through
tall legs, orbited by a crowd; a couple greet
for a first time; a group of lads go for beer
and curry and always, there is later.

Prosecco-fired hens from Stoke blow
into an inflatable man-doll; Nana appears
at the gate, her metal of news bent
inward, pendolino-style.

 

 

Ken Evans – Ken won Battered Moons and was runner-up in Poets & Players in 2016.
‘The Opposite of Defeat’ (Eyewear) featured work shortlisted in Bare Fiction’s pamphlet competition. A collection is due this summer. His poems feature in Envoi, Under the Radar, Lighthouse Literary Journal, The High Window, Obsessed with Pipework, and Interpreter’s House.

 

Poetry

Jo Haslam – Two Poems

 

Today we are delighted to feature two poems from Jo Haslam’s brand new collection, Fetch, published by Templar Poetry. The book will be launched with a special reading at Keats House on the 29 March. The collection draws on urban and rural landscapes, the world of painting, and experiences of displacement and loss to explore the evolving ties between family, culture and language.

 

Hoar Frost 

Whatever was lost to the open sky
is replaced by these drops of ghost water,
ice in its dreamstate blown from the mouth
of winter asleep, spreading its network
of furred spikes of moss and blanched fern.
What would it take to freeze each pearl
or fretted grass blade or touch them awake
to a world of rain? We look to the sky
laden with frost and cloud to release
its cold breath as whisper or iron word

 

 

Fritillary

What’s the meaning of this flower
that folds and opens in an hour
between showers
 

and sun, between the months
of March and April?
I push the bulbs eight inches down
 

to work with other hidden things
under earth and dark and stone
then take my paper and my pen
 

much as any gardener does
note the barely there green stem
the dangled fretwork of its head


as from the rain black ground
comes leper lily, meleagris
fritillus
, with its snakeskin on.

 

 

Jo Haslam – Jo is a Marsden based poet whose first collection Light from the Upper Left was published by Smith/Doorstop after winning the Poetry Business competition in 1994. This was followed by her collection The Sign for Water and a pamphlet Lunar Moths. Her work has appeared in poetry magazines and received recognition in major poetry competitions, including the 2010 National Poetry Competition where her poem ‘Wish’ won joint second prize. He third collection, Fetch, published by Templar Poetry is available now.

 

Poetry

Sarah Dixon

Our new house from the ale trail train

I spot it.
Know about over-dwellings
and this means we only own it
from the first floor.

Our attic window is open
and I see you wave.
You must be on a stool to do this.
Precarious.

I can’t always be there
to hold you
to warn you
not to reach up
as high as you can.

With a wobble of legs
I watch you grip the rim
and imagine you topple
and
fall

h
a
r
d

and
heavy.

I hear the impact of the earth.
Know you would not survive this.

I will you back in,
your bruised shins,
your dimpled bum,
your fingernails with an under-dwelling of soil
gathered by mud pie break-times
with new friends I can’t yet name.

I know what the front of our house looks like,
anyone who has travelled on the 184
and looked out at the right moment
on Manchester Road could know
the Yorkshire stone,
but only I can identify
our home from the back.
I know it is two along
from the one with the conservatory
loud with toys
and bright with wind-chimes.

I know it is fourth from the end
and we watch the trains
from the breakfast bar,
make notes of the times,
tick off journeys.

We bash Colne Valley mud
from our boots.
Each walk adds a layer
to our exploration,
each return means
a night of good sleep,
held down by the weight of fresh air
and Yorkshire expanse
that makes us drunk.

Our legs muscle
as we get used to hills.

We do not walk there
on autopilot yet.
We are remembering
each time we return
that our number is changed,
that this white stone front
is ours.

The click of the black cast iron gate,
instead of the clunk
of the wooden green one
back in Manchester.

 

 

Sarah L Dixon is based in Linthwaite near Huddersfield and tours as The Quiet Compere. She has been most recently published in Confluence. Her first book, ‘The sky is cracked’, was released by Half Moon Press in November 2017. Sarah’s inspiration comes from being close to water and adventures with her son, Frank (7).

 

http://thequietcompere.co.uk/

 

Poetry

Neil Clarkson

Manure

The dry air
had turned damp;
the cool stealth
of autumn.

We went to a friends
to collect the muck
the horse looked
on like we were
about to take its foal.

We shovelled fast in the cold;
the benevolence of steam
the comfort of straw.

Both of us pissed in it
to seal the goodness.
We spread it freely
then tarped the rest,
preserving nutrients from
leeching winter rain.

We didn’t yet have that
language of what
you take out
you must put back.

 

 

Neil Clarkson is a long-standing member of the Albert Poets, published in magazines including Pennine Platform, The Black Horse and Obsessed by Pipework. He has won prizes in numerous competitions. His debut collection, Build You Again from Wood, was published in February 2017 by Calder Valley Poetry.

 

Poetry

Maria Isakova Bennett

It was a Sunday Night and the Hospital was Short Staffed

Hooked to a drip,
she abandons her father’s mizpah ring
into my hand,

falls back onto a pillow
and labours whispers that make no sense.
At midnight, a priest scurries to her bed.

I sit, stand, sit, until a nurse guides me
to a visitor’s room. In darkness,
at two in the morning hot tears slide to my ears,

while an on call surgeon gives her one last chance.
I shiver in the heat of June
and she’s out of it in morphine.

After thirty years of daily offerings,
when I need God, prayers come cold and rote,
pleas remain in my mouth.

A steady voice asks about next of kin,
a pen draws a line across a page
and I taxi home to my daughters.

*

Sometimes I sit with her possessions:
folded paper with one stitch of ribbon
marks her twenty first birthday in 1943,

a card signed from family whose names
are as obsolete as themselves:
Cissy, Gertie and Albert.

On special occasions, I wear
a blue silk jacket,
handmade for her the year I was born.

 

 

Maria Isakova Bennett

Maria, from Liverpool, is widely published and has won and been placed in several international competitions. Last summer Maria was awarded a Northern Writers’ Award by Clare Pollard and launched a limited edition stitched poetry journal, Coast to Coast to Coast. Her pamphlet, All of the Spaces is published by Eyewear.


http://www.mariaisakova.com/coast-to-coast-to-coast-journal/

www.mariaisakova.com

https://store.eyewearpublishing.com/collections/eyewear-pamphlet-series/products/all-of-the-spaces

 

 

Poetry

Ben Jones

The Night I Did

When I first made the night, I did
The moonlight sloshed in jars
I pulled the blackness overhead
And pinned it there with stars
I spilled the moon a puddle
Like a ghost it rose aloft
I wove a gentle breeze, I did
A whisper in the trees, I hid
A lullaby to ease the lid
In silence, butter soft

I revelled in the night, I did
The shadow cast for me
I edged the world in silhouette
With silver filigree
I danced among the hollow trunks
And faded far from view
A tingle to the east, I spy
The purple glow of morning sky
A caution that the dawn is nigh
And I am overdue

 

 

Ben Jones lives in Leeds with his partner, children and dog. He has been writing poetry to pass the time for many years and, subsequently, doesn’t have many friends. He likes cakes too.

 

Poetry

Hilary Hughes

Mr Oystercatcher

Oh Mr Oystercatcher, with your orange-red bill
and long scarlet legs; you make your way along
the shoreline, piping your call as you go.

Is it because this is your land, your territory?
Because you have young, safe in their nests?
Or because this wide stretch of cling film water
is yours, is yours to wade in, to fly over, to hunt from?

What right have I, in longing to stay in this place?
Today’s a new day, time to move on, discover, rest, reflect.

As a small parcel of seaweed floats north with the tide,
and you, Mr Oystercatcher, resume your wading, feeding,
I thank God for this special place and offer it to Him,
… and to you, Mr Oystercatcher!

 

 

Hilary is a North Yorkshire-based writer and poet whose passions are: faith, family, linguistics and language, landscape, people watching and travel; her writing is infused with these.

‘Hit the Ground Running’ was published in 2013. She has co-written/contributed to other collections. Her new book, ‘GASP’ is released later this year.